What is Change Management? Thursday, Jan 22 2015 

Change management is the process of ensuring improvements to a system are absorbed and adopted as best as possible.  As noted in the blog on process improvement the company must first ask itself what do we want to achieve with this change (the goal).  Change management requires the company to ask who will be affected by these improvements, how will they react, and will the reaction benefit the improved process?  The company must also determine if the change can be implemented within management, within the company (including employees), or with the assistance of external parties.

The reason for the change needs to be clearly explained to those that will be affected.  In person communication is better than written communication but in person and written communication is the best choice.  Involving those that will be affected is an important step to gain consensus among all affected.  Their input in the planning of change will likely give additional insights in how to affectively implement change and how to accurately measure the impact of the changes.

How the affected reacts will depend on how and when they are informed of the change.  For example, an Jigsaw-Change-Managementimprovement in the process could be externally hiring better paid employees to perform a task not done before.  Those affected are the first line manager, anyone else in the section/department, and anyone internally capable of doing the better paid job that wasn’t given an opportunity to apply for the job.  Those who weren’t given an opportunity to apply will likely not be happy.

Whether the change is mainly determined at a management, whole company, or external party those affected need to buy in to the change.  The most effected way to gain buy in is to allow them to participate in the change.  This provides a sense of ownership on their part.  Ownership creates familiarity and makes the transition easier because it will not be sprung on them.  The point being regardless of where the change is implemented to allow those affected to have a sense of ownership.

When done correctly change management will rely on negotiation or perception management because change is hard and it is often easier to accept when viewed from a different view point.

Author,

James Webb

Advertisements

What is Process Management? Monday, Jan 12 2015 

Process improvement is the desire to design a new or improved methodology to make the customer happier by ensuring you, the company, is able to continue delivering the same product/service in a more efficient and/or effective manner. During this process you may also create an improved or new product. A car is an improvement of the process of transportation (increased speed over horse carriages), the internet an improvement of the way people access information (more people can access more information now), and the cell phone an improvement of the way people connect (the range of the phone increased from the cord to many places on the planet). The intended goal (desire) is efficiency in the building of the product and/or effectiveness of the product. Using the car as an example, the goal is to build a car with the least parts necessary and minimum time required (efficiency) and/or that performs as expected with minimal or no recalls so that it meets and hopefully exceeds the customer’s needs (effectiveness).

When you determine a need for an improved process also consider what you’re looking for a new or improved process-improvementproduct, efficiency in building product, or effectiveness of product. As stated above efficiency means less time, inventory, and/or cost to build and effectiveness means less complaints/recalls. If your goal is to build a new or improved product/service then process improvement can still be the appropriate path as the higher quality and/or easier to produce product/service can be marketed as a new product/service.

Once you determine what you’re looking for the proper metrics will keep you on track. Ineffective metrics will prevent the company from determining whether their goal is being met. Improved quality of a product (six sigma) will require a metric of testing the improved quality such as cutting through metal to test its properties. Fewer resources used to build a product (Iean thinking) will require metric of determining resources used such as time for build each component or the finished product.

After establishing a need for change and what that change is a company should determine how they will get everyone on board for the change which is change management.

Author

James Webb